An upside-down cake love

    Most people know about Pineapple Upside-Down cakes. They’re those flat cakes with the pound-cake color and sweet, fruit toppings. It has a legion of fans, but also plenty of haters. When researching for this story, we asked around our office, sent emails to our friends and even put out the alert on Twitter. Responses to our question, "Do you like upside-down cakes," ranged from "I don’t know if I’ve ever even had one" to "I don’t care about them one way or the other…sorry!" That last one came from our Senior Editor, who pitched the story in the first place!

    But we did get one really good response from our friend Melissa. She remembers her love affair with upside-down cakes happening in phases and said, "My mom used to make it when I was a kid, back in the days of pre-school and half-day Kindergarten." Ah that time when eating glue is perfectly acceptable…but we digress. "And then my cousin made a healthier version with whole-wheat flour, brown sugar and egg whites," Melissa said. "I fell in love with it again."

    And what’s not to love? The idea of an upside-down cake has been around for centuries, but the most recognizable form of the cake, the pineapple version, dates back to 1903 when canned pineapples became readily available. By the ’20s, the cake was one of the most popular in the States and fast becoming an American classic.

    Today, we have lots of varieties available besides pineapple. Take a look at some of the recipes below, all from Cooking.com, and get inspiration for your next upside-down, sweet treat.

     
    Apple-Cranberry Upside-Down Cake

     

     

     

     

     

     


    Peach Upside-Down Cake

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Plum-Almond Upside-Down Cake

     

     

     

     

     

     

     


    Frozen Pineapple Upside-Down Cake

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    – Whitney Teal

    Here’s more:
    Make your own Girl Scout cookies
    Mardi Gras madness
    When less is more: baking the Swedish way 

     

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