Black kids banned from pool

    More than 60 kids were booted from a swim club in Philadelphia over the color of their skin.
     
    As soon as the children from The Creative Steps Day Camp arrived at The Valley Swim club, they drew attention from other patrons.
     
    "I heard this lady, she was like, ‘Uh, what are all these Black kids doing here?’ She’s like, ‘I’m scared they might do something to my child,’" camper Dymire Baylor told NBC Philadelphia.
     
    The day camp had paid $1,900 for a membership to the club, which is a private organization that claims anyone can join. Unfortunately, one their first visit to the pool, the kids found out that that wasn’t entirely true.
     
    "When the Minority children got in the pool all of the Caucasian children immediately exited the pool," Horace Gibson, one of the camper’s parents, stated. "The pool attendants came and told the Black children that they did not allow minorities in the club and needed the children to leave immediately."
     
    After that, The Valley Swim Club suspended the camp’s membership and refunded of their fee. The day camp just wants what they originally paid for: a place for the kids to swim.
     
    For now, the kids aren’t clear on what they did to warrant their abrupt oust from the pool, but the swim club offered a harshly honest explanation.
     
    "There was concern that a lot of kids would change the complexion… and the atmosphere of the club," said Valley Swim Club President, John Duesler.
     
    Parents of the rejected campers are still waiting for the club to offer an apology for its actions, but in the meantime The Creative Steps Day Camp is looking for a new place that will the kids take a dip.

     

     

     

    – Sonya Eskridge

     

     

     

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