White House picks new social secretary

    Julianna Smoot has been pegged as the next White House Social Secretary.




     

     

     

     

     

     

    Julianna Smoot has been pegged as the next White House Social Secretary.


     
    The White House announced Saturday that the North Carolina native would be the newest member of the Obama administration. This is not the first time she’ll be working under President Barack Obama, however. She served as the finance director for his campaign.


     
    “I am humbled and excited to take on the role of White House Social Secretary and support the Obama administration in a different capacity,” said Julianna. “Over the last year, I have had the honor of building relationships in the international community through my work at USTR, and I am looking forward to implementing this experience at the White House.”


     
    Susan Sher, Michelle Obama’s chief of staff, said Julianne is a good fit because “brings extraordinary organization and people skills to the role, and sharp attention to detail – all attributes critical to the highly complex responsibilities” of the position. Julianna’s new role also includes duties as President Barack Obama’s deputy assistant.


     
    Julianna is taking over for Desiree Rogers, who will be stepping down from her post this month. She announced her resignation late last month to Chicago Sun-Times columnist Lynn Sweet, stating, "As we turn the corner on the first year, this is a good time for me to explore opportunities in the corporate world."


     
    Although Desiree did an outstanding job organizing White House musical events and spearheaded efforts to really help the venue live up to its reputation as the people’s house, she may best be remembered for the state dinner last year when Michael and Tareq Salahi somehow made it into the event without actually being invited.


     
    Desiree has said that incident is not the only reason she resigned.


     
    "The incident at the State Dinner was not a deciding factor," she said. "But it did show me a side of the job and of Washington that I had not seen before."



     

     

    — Sonya Eskridge




     

     

     

    Here’s more:
    Desirée Rogers under fire for White House party crashers
    Salahis: We’re not crashers

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