FCC plans to get everyone online

    The Federal Communications Commission has announced its plan to get more Americans access to high-speed Internet.  




     

     

     

     

     

     

    The Federal Communications Commission has announced its plan to get more Americans access to high-speed Internet.

     
    The FCC has sent a plan for national broadband access to Congress this week. Among other things, the commission announced that the initiative seeks to connect 100 million households to affordable high-speed service by 2020. 


     
    The plan was a required effort under President Barack Obama’s 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.


     
    The Commission found that only 65 percent of homes in the U.S. have Internet access, leaving about 14 million people without means to a connection. Now it hopes to close the huge gap by expanding service to reach 90 percent of Americans, including those in rural areas.
     
    “Above all else, the plan is a call to action to meet that challenge for our era,” said Blair Levin, Executive Director of the Omnibus Broadband Initiative at the FCC. “If we meet it, we will have networks, devices, and applications that create new solutions to seemingly intractable problems.”
     
    The FCC also wants to boost connections speeds to 100 megabits per second, which is more than 25 times faster than the average speed in the U.S. According to Akamai, an international service provider, Internet here runs at around 3.9 megabits per second.


     
    But the FCC is hoping the plan will do more than provide broader, faster access. The Commission would also like to see the increased service provide better emergency service by giving first responders a nationwide wireless network.


     

     

     

    – Sonya Eskridge

     

     

     

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