Rahm Emanuel back on Chicago ballot

    Rahm Emanuel has appealed an 11th-hour surprise on his campaign to become the next mayor of Chicago.


     

     

     

     

     

     

    Rahm Emanuel has appealed an 11th-hour surprise on his campaign to become the next mayor of Chicago.
     
    The Huffington Post reports that the Illinois Supreme Court has ordered Rahm’s name be put back on the Chicago mayoral ballot. His name was removed from the list of candidates yesterday after a lower court ruled him ineligible for candidacy because he hadn’t lived in Chicago for a year.
     
    Rahm’s legal team asked the supreme court to overturn the decision, contesting that it is "squarely inconsistent" with other rulings on similar matters. The supreme court told the Chicago Board of Elections to place Rahm’s name back on the ballot until the court comes to final decision on the issue. The case is still pending.
     
    Court rep. Joe Tybor told reporters that the case will be heard, but he didn’t offer any indication on when it will be brought before the bench. However, time to hear the case is running out as the board of elections will need to begin printing ballots in a few days.
     
    Had Rahm not appealed the removal, the board would have begun printing ballots not including his name today. His legal counsel, argued that the board had no right to remove Rahm’s name because the Illinois courts doesn’t require candidates to physically live in the state to be eligible to run for office.
     
    Rahm has been a resident of Chicago on paper for years. However, up until last fall, he’d been living in Washington, D.C., as President Barack Obama’s Chief of Staff, a post he officially resigned from in October.

     

     

     

    – Sonya Eskridge

     

     

     

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