Teen massacres mom

    As investigators continue to pick up the pieces of shattered glass from the bullet-ridden house where a 14-year-old murdered his mother in cold blood, friends and family are left in shock.

    On February 26, 2012, Joshua Smith shot his mother, Tamiko Robinson, 10 times as she lay asleep on her couch. Joshua’s 5-year-old sister, along with their aunt, survived the attack by jumping out of a window approximately six feet off the ground.

    The alleged motive for the attack was Tamiko’s attempt to stop her son from hanging out on the streets with older gang members.

    Joshua was arrested on the morning of February 27, while driving around in his mother’s car.

    Joshua’s uncle, Leshaun Roberts, believes the boy may have been under the influence of drugs at the time of the murder, noting that the teen had been skipping class and taking drugs recently.

    Joshua is being charged with first-degree murder and felony use of a firearm, which carry with them a life sentence and a two-year mandatory sentence, respectively.

    Detroit’s Mayor Dave Bing held a press conference earlier this week to address this, as well as a string of other crimes that have taken place in Detroit in recent weeks.

    "Let’s let these young people know we care about them, but at the same time we are not going to allow them to create havoc," said the mayor, adding that parents "needed to start discipline [sic] their children from the moment they come out of the womb."

    Joshua was arraigned in Detroit on Saturday, March 3, 2012.
     

     

    Watch the report on the tragedy here.

    —Jacob Rohn

     

    If you’re a parent, do stories like Tamiko’s affect how you discipline your child? What can be done to prevent these types of killings in the future? Leave your comments below.

     

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