Brian White argues ‘Good’ stereotypes

    Actor Brian White doesn’t mind playing the deadbeat and other roles that are sometimes stereotypical.

    The Good Deeds star said he enjoys the challenge of taking on parts that aren’t at all like his real self, and working with Tyler Perry in three films has given him that opportunity.

    Unlike the characters he played in Daddy’s Little Girls, I Can Do Bad All By Myself and Good Deeds, Brian, a newlywed with five younger sisters, knows how to respect women.

    While some criticize such roles for reinforcing negative stereotypes, Brian said Tyler does the Black community a service.

    “These are very, very, very important characters to be out there and discussed. They’re not —I don’t want to use the word ‘stereotype’—but I see lots and lots and lots of guys like those three guys,” he told Sister 2 Sister.

    In Daddy’s Little Girls, Brian played “a rich businessman who was cheating on his wife.” In I Can Do Bad All By Myself, he was “a lowlife pedophile leaching off Taraji [P. Henson]." In Good Deeds, his character, Walter, was a “guy who just can’t accept responsibility.”

    Brian sees good in bringing these characters to life. As long as they’re not portrayed as the hero, the actor said the roles teach women, like his five sisters, to make better romantic choices.

    “These kinds of guys are no good. I want girls, young ladies, women, to know that they can do bad in life all by themselves,” he said.

    So, it’s not a surprise that Brian defends Tyler against those who criticize him for his sometimes loud and boisterous characters.

    “I choose to be around Tyler because he’s a great person, and he’s given a great opportunity to me as an actor,” said Brian. “He’s a mentor and a role model."

    Newlywed Brian White offers marriage advice in the August 2012 issue of Sister 2 Sister.

    Good Deeds is available on DVD June 12. Watch exclusive interviews with the cast below.

     

    —Tracy L. Scott

     

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